Is It Getting Harder To See Close Objects? Speak To Your Optometrist About Presbyopia.

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Is It Getting Harder To See Close Objects? Speak To Your Optometrist About Presbyopia.

Have you noticed that you need to hold your phone farther from your face to read your texts? Do you struggle with up-close tasks such as reading? And have these problems only started occurring in the last several years? If you’re 40 or over, it’s most likely that you are developing presbyopia. As we age, our ability to see close objects tends to become worse. Presbyopia is a natural part of aging that the majority of people will experience at some point in their lives. This condition does not develop painfully nor will it lead to blindness, and it is exceedingly common. An increasing need to correct your vision as you age is completely normal and during an eye exam, your optometrist will be able to make recommendations for solutions that will improve your vision.

 

How An Optometrist Addresses Presbyopia

What Is Presbyopia?
This condition occurs when you gradually lose the ability to clearly see objects up close. Presbyopia is a natural part of aging that tends to begin around the time a person turns 40. As you age, presbyopia will likely become more severe as vision tends to decline until about age 65. Typically, you can tell you’re developing presbyopia if you need to hold your phone or books further away from your face. Presbyopia is very common and not cause for panic, as it doesn’t impact your eye health or cause complete vision loss like other eye conditions. Although presbyopia is a refractive error instead of an eye disease, you will want to see your optometrist for an eye exam to have your prescription assessed and to discuss reading eyeglasses and other vision correction options.

What Causes Presbyopia?
When we are young, the clear lens inside of our eye easily changes shape to alter the light entering the eye, which allows us to switch focus on objects that are near and far. The lens is affected by the muscles in the iris (the coloured part of the eye) expanding and contracting to control the amount of light that is let into the eye, which dictates the necessary shape of the lens. As we age, this lens becomes less flexible and it becomes more difficult for our eyes to adapt to see close objects.

How Can An Optometrist Address Presbyopia?
There is no known way to prevent the stiffening of the lens or to otherwise preemptively prevent presbyopia. But there are ways to address developing presbyopia so that you can still retain regular vision. Most commonly, your optometrist will prescribe eyeglasses. These may be eyeglasses for full-time wear (often using bifocals or progressive lenses) or reading eyeglasses designed for close-up tasks only. LASIK eye surgery or artificial lens implants called intraocular lenses (IOL) are also sometimes an option, although these options are far less common than eyeglasses. If you notice that close-up objects are becoming more difficult to see, the first step to correcting your vision is to visit your optometrist. Although it is likely just the development of presbyopia, your optometrist will need to ensure that your vision problems are not caused by other underlying conditions. Once presbyopia is diagnosed, your optometrist can determine your prescription and discuss your eyeglasses options with you.


Visit A Calgary Optometrist To Address Presbyopia

If you are having difficulty seeing close-up objects, it’s time to visit the optometrist. During an eye exam, your optometrist will determine a new prescription that can address your presbyopia and you can discuss with your optometrist if they recommend reading glasses, eyeglasses for all-day wear, contact lenses, or perhaps eye surgery. Our optometrists will work with you to help you determine the best presbyopia solution for your lifestyle. To book an eye exam with a Sunridge Eye Clinic Optometrist, call 1-403-280-7518 or fill out the online contact form.

 

FAQ

Q: Is there any way I can prevent presbyopia?
A: Although you can take steps to keep your eyes healthy for longer by eating a variety of nutrients and keeping your eyes safe from UV rays, there is currently no known way to prevent the development of presbyopia.

Q: Can presbyopia affect vision in low light?
A: Yes, some people with presbyopia notice an increase in glare as well as the need for more light to see well. Developing greater difficulty seeing in low light is a normal part of presbyopia, but it can also be indicative of other eye conditions as well and you should visit your optometrist for an eye exam if you are struggling with vision in low light.

Q: I’ve been getting a lot more headaches since my close vision has gotten worse. Are these related?
A: It’s fairly common for people with presbyopia who do not use any form of vision correction to develop headaches. If you’re not wearing the appropriate prescription and are instead trying to do up-close tasks without the ability to properly focus, it will strain the muscles around your eyes and your head to create tension headaches.


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